Attentional effects of masked famous faces (but not names) and subjective evaluations of a target person

Stone, Anna (2011) ‘Attentional effects of masked famous faces (but not names) and subjective evaluations of a target person’, Perceptual & Motor Skills, 112(2), pp. 451-476. (doi:10.2466/07.22.PMS.112.2.451-476).

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Abstract

Two experiments are reported using a 1986 version of the dot-probe paradigm of MacLeod, Mathews and Tata, in which the masked subliminal faces of famous persons were differentially associated with attention depending on participants’ attitudes towards the famous person. There was attentional avoidance of the faces of persons invoking high disgust (Exp. 1, n = 20) or dislike (Exp. 2) but attentional orientation towards the faces of persons invoking low disgust or liking. In Exp. 2 (n = 28) this effect was apparent for the faces but not the names of famous persons, despite evidence that the famous names were recognised without awareness. The aversion of attention from faces, but not the names of famous persons who are regarded in a negative light but who are not particularly threatening, may suggest an automatic tendency to avoid making eye contact with an undesirable person thereby avoiding unwanted social interaction.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Citation: Stone, A. (2011) 'Attentional effects of masked famous faces (but not names) and subjective evaluations of a target person'. Perceptual & Motor Skills, 112(2), pp. 451-476.
Divisions: Schools > Psychology, School of
Depositing User: Mr Stephen Grace
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2012 13:22
Last Modified: 09 Aug 2013 08:16
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10552/1514

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