Should children drink more water? The effects of drinking water on cognition in children

Edmonds, Caroline J. and Burford, Denise (2009) ‘Should children drink more water? The effects of drinking water on cognition in children’, Appetite, 52(3), pp. 776-779. (doi:10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.010).

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.appet.2009.02.010

Abstract

While dehydration has well-documented negative effects on adult cognition, there is little research on hydration and cognitive performance in children. We investigated whether having a drink of water improved children's performance on cognitive tasks. Fifty-eight children aged 7–9 years old were randomly allocated to a group that received additional water or a group that did not. Results showed that children who drank additional water rated themselves as significantly less thirsty than the comparison group (p = 0.002), and they performed better on visual attention tasks (letter cancellation, p = 0.02; spot the difference memory tasks, ps = 0.019 and 0.014).

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Citation: Edmonds, C.J. & Burford, D. (2009). ‘Should children drink more water? The effects of drinking water on cognition in children’, Appetite 52 (3) 776-779.
Divisions: Schools > Psychology, School of > Institute for Research in Child Development
Depositing User: Mr Stephen Grace
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2009 09:13
Last Modified: 19 Aug 2013 13:18
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/10552/448

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